Vacations

1 I am aware that vacations are generally domestic and often involve staying with family, although some families with higher socioeconomic status take occasional trips to Europe, to the USA or other tourist destinations.
2 I am aware that vacation choices are typically made based on spending time with people, rather than just visiting new places.
3 I am aware that purchasing tickets is typically done in person or occasionally through a travel agent, though bus/train tickets are rarely bought ahead of time.
4 I am aware that during vacations the already flexible time becomes more so.
5 I am aware that ecological parks are becoming popular in Latin America and a vacation destination.

Mail

1 I am aware that many countries do not have zip codes.
2 I am aware that the use of P.O. Boxes is common in many countries instead of home delivery.

Money

1 I am aware that each country has a different currency, though other currencies (such as the US dollar or the EU euro) are commonly accepted in Latin America.
2 I am aware that credit card use is not as common as in the USA, and obtaining one is difficult, whereas most people use cash.
3 I am aware that debit cards are mostly used to withdraw money from an ATM, rather than used as a form of payment directly.
4 I am aware that stores typically want smaller bills or exact change.
5 I am aware that coins often include larger denominations than in the US, i.e. the equivalent of $2 or $5.

Expressing Likes

1 I am aware that people often show their likes/dislikes with facial expressions and more openly in situations where English speakers are often more reserved (i.e. the assignment of a difficult task in a class).
2 I am aware that a Spanish speaker is often very adamant about his/her likes and will pressure the interlocutor to agree with them. (i.e. preference for a certain type of food)

Gratitude

1 I am aware that Hispanics express gratitude in a way that may sound exaggerated to an English speaker, but do so less often.
2 I am aware that visitors typically give a small gift to hosts, but contributing to the meal with a dish is less common than in the US.
3 I am aware that letter/post-card writing is less common than in the US (It is not the norm to send a thank you card for a gift or service).

Society

1 I am aware that social classes are determined by tradition and money

Economy

1 I am aware that most Hispanic countries belong to the “third world” category.
2 I am aware that most businesses are small and/or family businesses.

Government

1 I am aware that most of the Hispanic countries are centralized republics with one national government, while a few are federal in nature with provincias or estados acting like states, and in Spain the comunidades autónomas serve as states with more autonomy than in the US.
2 I am aware that most Hispanic countries are democratic and elect their leaders.
3 I am aware that in many regions with complex histories or minority cultures movements for independence are rather common.

Restaurants

1 I am aware that the waiter to diner relationship is often formal or distant.
2 I am aware that tipping is not required, is usually a small sum of money, and may occur in situations such as restaurants, supermarkets, barber shop, etc.
3 I am aware that most restaurants allow you to seat yourself.
4 I am aware that having many TV’s in a restaurant or bar is not very common.
5 I am aware that restaurants offer fewer menu items, emphasizing a couple of daily specials that are less expensive than other dishes.
6 I am aware that making reservations (restaurants, events, hotels) is not very common, and is not always possible.

Meals

1 I am aware that it is typical to eat meals at home around the table with family, staying for a time afterward to converse (sobremesa).
2 I am aware that it is not common to watch TV or read the newspaper during a family meal.
3 I am aware that daily meal structure differs by region: for example, in Spain it is typical to have desayuno (breakfast), café (coffee and a small late morning snack), almuerzo (a small meal around 12:00PM), comida (a larger meal around 2:00 or 3:00PM), merienda (a late afternoon snack) and cena (a modest dinner around 10:00PM); in most Latin American countries it is more common to have 3 meals: desayuno (morning), almuerzo (noon) or comida (2:00PM) y cena (7:00PM), a time for tea or coffee, and little or no other snacking.
4 I am aware that in Spain,  after la comida (2:00-3:00 p.m.) still some people take la siesta, which is time to rest or to take a short nap, especially in smaller cities and towns.
5 I am aware that many people in big cities do not have time to go back home for the main meal of the day (almuerzo/comida) and eat in a place near their jobs.
6 I am aware that it is typical to wish others “buen provecho” while they are eating or afterward.